' Sleeping More May Curb Sugar Cravings', Really???

Is the trick to cutting cravings for sugar foods as simple as getting a good night’s sleep? A new small study from the UK suggests that may be the case.     It’s no surprise that tossing and turning all night can cause a person to feel tired, cranky and out of sorts the next day. But missing out on the recommended minimum of 7 hours of nightly shut-eye is also lined to various health conditions, such as obesity and cardiometabolic diseases, which include diabetes, heart disease and stroke, according to the study.     With this in mind, extending sleep lead to a reduction in intake of [ added ] sugars, by which we mean the sugars that are added to foods by manufacturers or in cooing at home, as well as sugars in honey, syrups and fruit juice, suggests that a simple change in lifestyle amy really help people to consume [ healthier diets ].     Increasing time in bed for an hour or so longer may lead to healthier food choices. This further strengthens the link between short sleep and poorer quality diets.

Is the trick to cutting cravings for sugar foods as simple as getting a good night’s sleep? A new small study from the UK suggests that may be the case.

It’s no surprise that tossing and turning all night can cause a person to feel tired, cranky and out of sorts the next day. But missing out on the recommended minimum of 7 hours of nightly shut-eye is also lined to various health conditions, such as obesity and cardiometabolic diseases, which include diabetes, heart disease and stroke, according to the study.

With this in mind, extending sleep lead to a reduction in intake of [ added ] sugars, by which we mean the sugars that are added to foods by manufacturers or in cooing at home, as well as sugars in honey, syrups and fruit juice, suggests that a simple change in lifestyle amy really help people to consume [ healthier diets ].

Increasing time in bed for an hour or so longer may lead to healthier food choices. This further strengthens the link between short sleep and poorer quality diets.

Randi Silverman Comment